Penguin Canada

  • Vanishing and Other Stories explores emotional and physical absences, the ways in which people leave, are left, and whether or not it's ever possible to move on. Readers will encounter a skinny ice-cream scooper named Nina Simone, a vanishing visionary of social utopia, a French teacher who collects fiancés, and a fortune-telling mother who fails to predict the heartbreak of her own daughter. The characters in this collection will linger in the imagination, proving that nothing is ever truly forgotten.

  • Anglais The Hanging Valley

    Peter Robinson

    It began with a faceless, maggot-ridden corpse in a tranquil, hidden valley above the village of Swainshead. Or did it really begin with the unsolved murder in the same area over five years earlier? The villagers, especially those who frequent the White Rose, are annoyingly silent. Among the suspects are the Collier brothers, Stephen and Nicholas, from the wealthiest and most powerful family in Swainsdale; John Fletcher, a local farmer; Sam Greenock, owner of the village's best guest house; and his unhappy wife, Katie, who knows more than she realizes. When the Colliers use their influence to slow down the investigation and the others clam up, Inspector Banks heads for Toronto to track down the killer. He soon finds himself in a race against time as events rush towards the shocking conclusion.

  • Anglais Final Account

    Peter Robinson

    When a mild-mannered accountant is brutally murdered, Inspector Banks is called in to investigate. It's a difficult case--the more Banks learns about the victim, Keith Rothwell, the more apparent it becomes that he was not at all what he seemed to be. Beneath the placid veneer lay a secret life of deception, sex and violence. The case takes yet another unexpected twist when Banks's old sparring partner, DS Richard "Dirty Dick" Burgess, turns up from the Yard. Haunted by his attraction to one of the suspects, a beautiful young classical musician, Banks finds himself racing against time as the killers seem to be dogging his footsteps. Only after he pits his job against his sense of justice does he discover the truth. And the truth leads him to one of the most difficult decisions of his career.

  • On her first voyage as a stewardess aboard the Empress of Ireland, Ellie is drawn to the solitary fire stoker who stands by the ships rail late at night, often writing in a journal. Jim. Ellie finds it hard to think of his name now. After their wonderful time in Quebec City, that awful night happened. The screams, the bodies, the frigid waters she tries hard to tell herself that he survived, but its hard to believe when so many didnt. So when Wyatt Steele, journalist at The New York Times asks her for her story, Ellie refuses. But when he shows her Jims journal, she jumps at the chance to be able to read it herself, to find some trace of the man she had fallen in love with, or perhaps a clue to what happened to him. Theres only one catch: she will have to tell her story to Steele and hell pay her by giving her the journal, one page at a time.

  • Anglais Tiger Hills

    Sarita Mandanna

    As the first girl born to the Nachimada family in over 60 years, the beautiful Devi is the object of adoration of her entire family. Strong-willed and confident, she befriends the shy Devanna, a young boy whose mother has died under tragic circumstances. The two quickly become inseparable, until Devi meets Machu the tiger killer, a hunter of great repute and a man of much honour and pride. Soon they fall deeply in love, an attraction that drives a wedge between Devi and Devanna. It is this tangled relationship among the three that leads to a devastating tragedy--an event that forever changes their fates and has unforeseen and far-reaching consequences for generations to come.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.

  • A heartwarming look at how happiness--and redemption--can be found at both ends of the leash in all kinds of places Elizabeth Abbott had always been an animal lover, sharing her life with all kinds of dogs in need. But when worlds collided and her beloved dog Tommy was left behind in Haiti, a new journey began: one that would take her to some very surprising places and ultimately teach her some essential truths about the power of hope and redemption. From the soulless concrete corridors of an American prison to the halls of a Canadian hospital to life among the ruins in post-war Serbia, Abbott meets people whose lives are changed forever by a wagging tail and a pair of soulful eyes--and dogs who find a new lease on life with devoted human companions. Throughout Dogs and Underdogs, Abbott shares her own incredible and often amusing stories of rescuing dogs in need of shelter, friendship, and love: devoted Tommy, the inspiration who began it all; irrepressible Bonzi, the beagle who charmed his way into prisoners hearts; sweet Alice, the little mama who survived a puppy mill to be mothered by other dogs; and many more. With wit and passion, Abbott digs down into the deepest roots of the humananimal bond, showing us that together people and dogs can find hope and happiness.

  • Aimées rural homesteader upbringing, years working as a professional chef, and everyday life as a busy mom led to the creation of the hugely popular blog Simple Bites. Raising three young children with husband Danny, Aimée traded her tongs and chef whites for a laptop and camera, married her two passions--mothering and cooking--and has since been creating recipes with an emphasis on whole foods for the family table, sharing stories, tips and inspiring readers to make the family-food connection on the Simple Bites blog. Brown Eggs and Jam Jars is Aimées long-awaited cookbook inspired by her urban homesteading through the seasons and the joyous events they bring. It embraces year-round simple food with fresh flavours from celebrating spring with a stack of Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes and pure maple syrup, to a simple late-summer harvest dinner with Chili-Basil Corn on the Cob and Lemon Oregano Roast Chicken. Autumn favourites include Apple Cinnamon Layer Cake with Apple Butter Cream Cheese Frosting and Make-Ahead Currant Scones that are delicious topped with homemade Strawberry-Honey Jam with Orange Zest. Comfort meals include Chicken Leek Shepherds Pie and Slow Cooker Cider Ham; homemade treats abound like Whole-What Chocolate Chunk Cookies with Orange Zest, Cinnamon Shortbread Bars with Dark Chocolate Ganache, Ice Cider Caramel Corn, and much more. Created for the family-minded home cook, Aimée shares over 100 recipes from melt-on-your-tongue maple butter tarts to tangy homemade yogurt that have a touch of nostalgia, feature natural ingredients, and boast plenty of love. Aimées heart-warming stories capture everyday life in a busy family. In addition, she shares tips and advice on how to get the whole family involved in cooking from the ground up and enjoying homemade food. Brown Eggs and Jam Jars will inspire you to connect your family and food right where you are in life--from growing your own tomatoes to making a batch of homemade cookies. Enjoy your urban homestead!

  • Anglais Crazy Town

    Robyn Doolittle

    His drug and alcohol-fuelled antics made world headlines and engulfed a city in unprecedented controversy. Toronto Mayor Rob Fords personal and political troubles have occupied centre stage in North Americas fourth largest city since news broke that men involved in the drug trade were selling a videotape of Ford appearing to smoke crack cocaine. Toronto Star reporter Robyn Doolittle was one of three journalists to view the video and report on its contents in May 2013. Her dogged pursuit of the story has uncovered disturbing details about the mayors past and embroiled the Toronto police, city councilors, and ordinary citizens in a raucous debate about the future of the city. Even before those explosive events, Ford was a divisive figure. A populist and successful city councillor, he was an underdog to become mayor in 2010. His politics and mercurial nature have split the amalgamated city in two. But there is far more to the story. The Fords have a long, unhappy history of substance abuse and criminal behavior. Despite their troubles, they are also one of the most ambitious families in Canada. Those close to the Fords say they often compare themselves to the Kennedys and believe they were born to lead. Regardless of whether the mayor survives the scandal, the Ford name is on the ballot in the mayoralty election of 2014. Fast-paced and insightful, Crazy Town is a page-turning portrait of a troubled man, a formidable family and a city caught in an jaw-dropping scandal.

  • Anglais Joyous Health

    Joy Mccarthy

    Joyous Health is a fresh new approach to eating that will change the way you think about food and what you eat, and it offers a simple and practical path to creating a healthy lifestyle. In just six short weeks, holistic nutritionist Joy McCarthy, creator of the popular blog Joyous Health, will guide you through an easy-to-follow and flexible program. Youll quickly be eating and living joyously and on a permanent path to good health with amazing results--both inside and out--that include: improved digestion increased energy and zest for life sleeping like a baby glowing skin and shiny hair balanced hormones weight loss and increased libido lowered blood pressure and cholesterol feeling fabulous every day of the week Joyous Health celebrates eating delicious, clean, whole foods and enjoying a vibrant lifestyle. Inside youll learn all about the best foods and habits for joyous health, foods to avoid, benefits of detoxing, how to create a joyous kitchen, along with a ten-day meal plan to get you started. Featuring beautiful colour photography throughout, the book also features eighty recipes with pure ingredients and delicious combinations--including Carrot Cake Smoothie, Coconut Flour Banana Pancakes, Thai Beetroot Soup, Chewy Almond Butter Cookies, Curry Chicken Burgers, and Double-Chocolate Gluten-Free Cookies.

  • It's one thing we all have in common. We've all been to school. But as Zander Sherman shows in this fascinating, often shocking account of institutionalized education, sending your kids off to school was not always normal. In fact, school is a very recent invention. Taking the reader back to 19th-century Prussia, where generals, worried about soldiers' troubling individuality, sought a way to standardize every young man of military age, through to the most controversial debates that swirl around the world about the topic of education today, Sherman tells the often astonishing stories of the men and women-and corporations-that have defined what we have come to think of as both the privilege and the responsibility of being educated. Along the way, we discover that the SAT was invented as an intelligence test designed to allow the state to sterilize "imbeciles," that suicide in the wake of disappointing results in the state university placement exams is the fifth leading cause of death in China, and that commercialized higher education seduces students into debt as cynically as credit card companies do. Provocative, entertaining-and even educational-The Curiosity of School lays bare the forces that shape the institution that shapes all of us.

  • "Dear Ethan: I know you must be terribly confused, a little bit scared and thinking, hoping, praying, that the plane will return. It will not." Ethan can barely believe it. Until now, his biggest problems have been trying to stay in one school without getting expelled and finding his next drink. But after Ethan's drunken imitation of the current headmaster goes up on YouTube, his father steps in with a shockingly drastic measure. Now Ethan is sprawled in the sand. In the Sahara desert. Alone. According to his father's letter, Ethan is to trek 200 km across the desert to the city of Tunis, with the help of a guide and three other young people. Confused, hungover, and-if he is truthful-more than a little scared, Ethan has no choice. He will face sandstorms, vipers, and agonizingly painful blisters ... but, most painful of all, he will face his inner demons and come to a true realization of who he really is.

  • Anglais Wallflowers

    Eliza Robertson

    From windswept Pacific beaches to the inner reaches of the human heart, Wallflowers is a shimmering and often surprising journey of discovery, with many unexpected turns along the way. Eliza Robertson has created a cast of unique and wholly engaging characters. Here there are swindlers and innocents, unlikely heroes and gritty survivors; they teach us how to trap hummingbirds, relinquish dreams gracefully, and feed raccoons without getting bitten. Wish you were here letters on a road trip parallel a womans painful trip into her familys dysfunctional past; reminiscences of a beloved sibling are inextricably bound up with calamity; and roommate problems lead to a surprising (and skin-crawling) revelation. Robertson smashes stereotypes even as she shows us remarkable new ways of experiencing the world--and of relating to our fellow human beings. Quirky and masterful, Wallflowers is a bouquet of unconventional delights from a powerful new voice.

  • Anglais The Comeback

    John Ralston Saul

    Once again, John Ralston Saul presents the story of Canadas past so that we may better understand its present and imagine a better future. Historic moments are always uncomfortable, Saul writes in this impassioned argument, calling on all of us to embrace and support the comeback of Aboriginal peoples. This, he says, is the great issue of our time the most important missing piece in the building of Canada. The events that began late in 2012 with the Idle No More movement were not just a rough patch in Aboriginal relations with the rest of Canada. What is happening today between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals is not about guilt or sympathy or failure or romanticization of the past. It is about citizens rights. It is about rebuilding relationships that were central to the creation of Canada. These relationships are just as important to its continued existence. The centrality of Aboriginal issues and peoples has the potential to open up a more creative way of imagining ourselves and a more honest narrative for Canada. Wide in scope but piercing in detail, The Comeback presents a powerful portrait of modern Aboriginal life in Canada, in contrast with the perceived failings so often portrayed in politics and in media. Saul illustrates his arguments by compiling a remarkable selection of letters, speeches and writings by Aboriginal leaders and thinkers, showcasing the extraordinarily rich, moving and stable indigenous point of view across the centuries.

  • Bill Gastons characteristic keen insight and wit dazzle in this new collection. Here, we see the world through the prism of unfamiliar perspectives: a bank executive whose excellent sex life might in fact be killing her, an amorous tree surgeon better attuned to the values of his patients than to other people, a vacationing schizophrenic wary of his housemates, a pizza-delivery boy convinced hes witnessed magic--all struggling with the world as they see it. This versatile collection--at times darkly playful, absurd, or shockingly real--illustrates how we can fail to understand the simplest of truths and how we are trapped by the peculiarities of our own points of view. In Gastons hands, the outlandish becomes comprehensible and everyday life begins to look strange. What unifies these stories and their characters is the underlying faith in the humanity of even the most dangerously misguided among us. Brazenly entertaining, but just as often heartbreaking, Juliet Was a Surprise portrays the humour and unfairness of life through the blunders of quixotic men and women with whom we cant help but sympathize.

  • For ten years, listeners of The Vinyl Cafe have shared their personal stories with Stuart McLean on The Vinyl Cafe Story Exchange. To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the segment, Stuart and his long-time radio producer, Jess Milton, have collected their favourites. The result is a wise, wonderful anthology of stories about rituals and romance, road trips and guitar licks, Saturday-night hockey games and Sunday morning pancakes. A story about an exploding outhouse sits right beside one about a lost love because that's just what happens in life. Sad things are all tangled up with funny things and sweet things, too.

  • Before internationally acclaimed author Joseph Boyden penned his bestselling novel Three Day Road and his Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning novel, Through Black Spruce, he published a powerful collection of thirteen stories about modern Aboriginal life that made readers and reviewers take notice. These stories of love, loss, rage and resilience match virtuosic style with clever wit to turn stereotypes on their head and reveal the traditions and grace of our First Peoples. Readers come to know a butterfly-costumed boy fascinated by the world of professional wrestling, a young woman who falls in love with a wolf, to the leader of an all-girl Native punk band and Painted Tongue, the unforgettable character from Through Black Spruce. Though each story is told in a different and distinct voice, they are all united by their captivating vitality, nuanced perceptions and vigorous prose.

  • In 2011, D.J. McIntosh took the book world by storm with her debut novel,The Witch of Babylon. Praised for its "stellar research" and "superb writing", it introduced readers to John Madison, a rakish New York art dealer with a past, who uncovered a fabulous treasure trove of antiquities in the hills outside of Baghdad and the truth behind a famous story long believed to by a myth. In the highly anticipated sequel, New York art dealer John Madison travels to London to purchase at auction a rare seventeenth-century Italian book of fairy tales for an anonymous client. Before he can deliver it to the buyer, he is robbed by a mysterious man claiming to be the book's author. When his client disappears and the book's provenance is questioned, Madison realizes that the only way to find the buyer, recover the lost book, and save his reputation is to immerse himself in the world of European aristocracy and bibliophilic obsession. Along the way, he discovers that a well-loved children's tale contains a necromancer's spell and the truth about an ancient Mesopotamian plague.

  • Anglais Camp X

    Eric Walters

    It's 1943, and nearly-12-year-old George and his older brother Jack are spending a restless wartime summer in Whitby, Ontario, where their mom is working at a munitions plant while their dad is off fighting the Germans. One afternoon, the boys stumble across Canada's top-secret spy camp-and so begins an exciting and terrifying adventure as George and Jack get caught up in the covert activities of Camp X. Fascinated by Camp X and its secrets, the boys begin to suspect local townspeople of being spies. Is the police chief keeping tabs on people for enemy purposes? Is Jack's boss at the newspaper really amassing information for sinister reasons? Unable to resist the camp's allure, the boys keep going back to find out more details of what's going on-they even meet William Stephenson, the Man Called Intrepid himself. They also attract the attention of a very sinister character, someone who is determined to use George and Jack's knowledge against the Allies, no matter the consequences . . . or the casualties.

  • Clarinet Reid is a pretty typical teenager. On the surface. Shes smart, but a bit of slacker; outgoing, but just a little insecure; not exactly a mischief-maker but trouble tends to find her wherever she goes. Also? She unwittingly carries a centuries-old Druid Blood Curse running through her veins. Now, with a single thoughtless act, what started off as the Summer Vacation in Dullsville suddenly spirals into a deadly race to find a stolen artifact, avert an explosive catastrophe, save a Celtic warrior princess, right a dreadful wrong that happened centuries before Clare was even born, and if theres still time-- literally--maybe even get a date. This is the kind of adventure that happens to a girl once every never.

  • It was like a scene out of a thriller: one night in April 2012, Chinas most famous political activist--a blind, self-taught lawyer--climbed over the wall of his heavily guarded home and escaped. For days, his whereabouts remained unknown; after he turned up at the American embassy in Beijing, a furious round of high-level negotiations finally led to his release and a new life in the United States. Chen Guangcheng is a unique figure on the world stage, but his story is even more remarkable than we knew. The son of a poor farmer in rural China, blinded by illness when he was an infant, Chen was fortunate to survive a difficult childhood. But despite his disability, he was determined to educate himself and fight for the rights of his countrys poor, especially a legion of women who had endured forced sterilizations under the hated one child policy. Repeatedly harassed, beaten, and imprisoned by Chinese authorities, Chen was ultimately placed under house arrest. After a year of fruitless protest and increasing danger, he evaded his captors and fled to freedom. Both a riveting memoir and a revealing portrait of modern China, this passionate book tells the story of a man who has never accepted limits and always believed in the power of the human spirit to overcome any obstacle.

  • The Right to Be Cold is a human story of resilience, commitment, and survival told from the unique vantage point of an Inuk woman who, in spite of many obstacles, rose from humble beginnings in the Arctic community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec--where she was raised by a single parent and grandmother and travelled by dog team in a traditional, ice-based Inuit hunting culture--to become one of the most influential and decorated environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world. The Right to Be Cold explores the parallels between safeguarding the Arctic and the survival of Inuit culture--and ultimately the world--in the face of past, present, and future environmental degradation. Sheila Watt-Cloutier passionately argues that climate change is a human rights issue and one to which all of us on the planet are inextricably linked. The Right to Be Cold is the culmina­tion of Watt-Cloutiers regional, national, and international work over the last twenty-five years, weaving historical traumas and current issues such as climate change, leadership, and sustainability in the Arctic into her personal story to give a coherent and holistic voice to an important subject.

  • In this inspiring book, Harvard-trained child and adult psychiatrist and expert in human motivation Dr. Shimi Kang provides a guide to the art and science of inspiring children to develop their own internal drive and a lifelong love of learning. Drawing on the latest neuroscience and behavioral research, Dr. Kang shows why pushy tiger parents and permissive jellyfish parents actually hinder self-motivation. She proposes a powerful new parenting model: the intelligent, joyful, playful, highly social dolphin. Dolphin parents focus on maintaining balance in their childrens lives to gently yet authoritatively guide them toward lasting health, happiness, and success.
    As the medical director for Child and Youth Mental Health community programs in Vancouver, Dr. Kang has witnessed firsthand the consequences of parental pressure: anxiety disorders, high stress levels, suicides, and addictions. As the mother of three children and as the daughter of immigrant parents who struggled to give their children the best in life--her mother could not read and her father taught her math while they drove around in his taxi--Dr. Kang argues that often the simplest benefits we give our children are the most valuable. By trusting our deepest intuitions about what is best for our kids, we will in turn allow them to develop key dolphin traits to enable them to thrive in an increasingly complex world: adaptability, community-mindedness, creativity, and critical thinking.Life is a journey through ever-changing waters, and dolphin parents know that the most valuable help we can give our children is to assist them in developing their own inner compass. Combining irrefutable science with unforgettable real-life stories, The Dolphin Parent walks readers through Dr. Kangs four-part method for cultivating self-motivation. The book makes a powerful case that we are not forced to choose between being permissive or controlling. The third option--the option that will prepare our kids for success in a future that will require adaptability--is the dolphin way.

  • At turns heartbreaking and wise, tender and wry, Bobcat and Other Stories establishes Rebecca Lee as one of the most powerful and original voices in Canadian literature. A university student on her summer abroad is offered the unusual task of arranging a friend's marriage. Secret infidelities and one guest's dubious bobcat-related injury propel a Manhattan dinner party to its unexpected conclusion. Students at an elite architecture retreat seek the wisdom of their revered mentor but end up learning more about themselves and one another than about their shared craft. In these acutely observed and scaldingly honest stories Lee gives us characters who are complex and flawed, cracking open their fragile beliefs and exposing the paradoxes that lie within their romantic and intellectual pursuits. Whether they're in the countryside of the American Midwest, on a dusty prairie road in Saskatchewan, or among the skyscrapers and voluptuous hills of Hong Kong, the terrain is never as difficult to navigate as their own histories and desires.

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